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Guest Speaker – Peter Gordon | OffShoot Photography Society

Guest Speaker – Peter Gordon

Mar 8, 2014 | Guest Speakers

peter-gordon-tile-166x266-at-72 The 55 members who attended the weekly Club meeting on Monday, 4th March were privileged to hear Irish Professional Photographer of the Year (2013), Peter Gordon, deliver a highly informative talk and wonderful image slideshows. Peter is best known to us at Offshoot for his Explore Light blog and digital landscape workshops, courses and tours.Peter showed us images from his projects such as Wild Garden, Atlantic Fringe and Life and Death – The Temple, an amazing collection and we were treated to his commentary in relation to both the technical and artistic aspects of each shot. You can order or pre-order his books here. From a technical point of view, Peter advised us his preferred default camera settings are f11 at ISO 100, he uses a cable release and tripod as well as mirror lockup. Focusing a third of the way into the shot and metering on both foreground and sky. He exposes for the foreground while using neutral density filters to hold back the sky from burning out (eg a .6 / 2 stop ND Hard) From an artistic point of view, Peter showed us delightful images of simple, open landscapes and seascapes, often isolating a particular detail rather than wide vistas. Always atmospheric and sometimes moody – the more to engage you with the photo and make its interest longer lasting.The evening finished up with a slideshow of images taken from his week long attendance at the Burning Man experience in Nevada – Peter has assembled a body of work entitled Life and Death – The Temple and while he has shown a small selection of individual images from this project before, this was his first public presentation of the project as a whole. Its an amazing collection of poignant portraits, a rememberance of loved ones and a celebration of life – all based in and around the temporary Temple structure which is symbolically burned at the end of the festival.

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